Author Archives: jpminda

Inspiration in the Lab

I run a mid sized cognitive psychology lab: it’s me as the PI, 2 PhD students 3 master’s students and a handful of undergraduate honours students and RAs. We are a reasonably productive lab, but there are times when I think we could be doing more in terms of getting our work out and also […]

Taming My Distracted Mind

There is mounting evidence that digital devices, screens, smartphones are a real roadblock to productivity. The very tools that are supposed to make us more productive might be robbing us of that ability. The Modern Worker I’m a psychology professor at a large research institution. This means that although I do spend some time teaching in […]

Le biais de confirmation: The story of the Bilingual Advantage 

The newest salvo in the psychology’s “reproducibility crisis” is not in social psychology, but is hitting the field of psycholinguistics. In this case, the evidence is mounting that the so called “bilingualism advantage” may not be an advantage after all. Worse, it may something like the Mozart Effect for psycholinguistics…That is, an effect that is plausible […]

Cognitive Bias and Guns in America

I posed the following question this week (Oct. of 2015)  to the students in my 3rd year Psychology of Thinking class. “How many of you think that the US is a dangerous place to visit?” About 70% of the students raised their hands. This is surprising to me because although I live and work in […]

The Way the Music Died

I almost never listen to music any more. That’s a sad state of affairs for anyone, but strikes me as a nearly complete disconnect from my former self….

University students are afraid of everything

Note: I wrote this as an attempt to think about the deeper issue of universities (students, faculty, and admin) placing an increasing premium on comfort, the “best student experience”, and reducing challenges. Normally, very few people read my blog (see my earlier post about that), so I was really excited to see how much action this piece […]

Redesigning my Graduate Seminar

I’m writing this to crowdsource and to get advice on course design, so this might not be the most interesting blog entry I’ve ever written. But if this is the kind of thing that intrigues you…read on! I teach a graduate seminar on cognition every two years. It’s one of the required courses for our cognition […]